‘Corsage’ Isn’t A Historically Accurate Film. Who Cares, When Vicky Krieps Is This Good?

'Corsage' Isn't A Historically Accurate Film. Who Cares, When Vicky Krieps Is This Good?

Queen Elisabeth of Austria and Queen Elisabeth of Hungary had everything a man could dream of except what he wanted: happiness.

If this sounds like a story you've heard before, then it is, but Corsage, a film by Marie Kreuzer, adapted the story (sort of tossing it out) and played with the era as a whole.

In real life, Elizabeth certainly wasn't sung by the 19th-century chanter who sang "As the Tears Go" by the Rolling Stones. (The stones are not that old.) But it worked. Other parts of the story are more gruesome.

And this is not new territory, as anyone who saw Sofia Coppola's 2006 Marie Antoinette will attest. But what makes Corsage so fresh and alive is the introduction of Vicki Cripps as the main character.

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Director Marie Kreuzer is not afraid to play with history

When we first see him, he's holding his breath in the sink while the maintenance crew, who he realizes are worried about them because they can't hear yet, pulls out some sort of healthcare system. She also had a habit of always wearing tight cornices (obviously no exception to historical fact), so she got tired of being choked by other women.

In other words, it's not just horseback riding and hairdos.

Elizabeth, in an unhappy and generally unhappy marriage, became the subject of gossip; Your weight is an obsession. But trying to keep him is undoubtedly one of the few forms of control available to him. Not that he was opposed to the unimaginable trappings of wealth. By no means. When he orders his shy friend to mount his horse, it is a sudden shock and a reminder of his position – if he does not, he will not lead his life as a man who abuses his power and authority.

But Elizabeth yearns for more, although it is not clear what more.

And maybe so. Perhaps she wants to hear her say a few more words to her daughter at one of the endless formal dinners with her husband, Emperor Franz Joseph (Florian Teichmeister).

He is stupid, manipulative and inconsiderate. Her job, she stressed to Elizabeth, was to protect the Empire. It means "represent".

This explanation he offered to Elizabeth in the form of a reproach after she had left the crowded dinner, where she was supposed to sit quietly and drink some soup or something of the kind. He used anachronistic symbols, although those gathered around the table had no difficulty in deciphering their meaning.

Elizabeth is a modern woman in a non-modern time.

Elizabeth's 40th birthday, which her doctors thought was too long for her age, was the cause of at least some of her boredom. But not all. Maybe Kreutzer Replacements could use this amazing ballad "Unsatisfied" for a soundtrack. It will be suitable.

Elizabeth found solace in things like visiting hospitals for the wounded and the mentally ill. But on one of these visits, she became disillusioned with the way her husband handled public affairs. wave to them. In general, he treats her like a child when he does not pay attention to her. Her desire for freedom, her stubborn ideas, her inability to obey her husband – all this impresses her.

In short, Elizabeth is a very modern woman living in an unfashionable time, and she doesn't like the boundaries that come with them. Cripps, of Phantom Thread fame, captures this dichotomy brilliantly. This is a unique achievement.

If you're a history student or a Wikipedia fan, some aspects of the movie may bother you, especially the ending. But this is optional. If you want hard facts, watch documentaries. Check out what Kreuzer and Crips have come up with for something big.

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Contact Goodykoontz at [email protected] Facebook: facebook.com/GoodyOnFilm. Twitter: @goodyk.

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