Hamline University Under Fire For Art Professors Dismissal

Hamline University Under Fire For Art Professors Dismissal
hamline university

Public Radio Kerem Yücel/Minnesota via AP

Aram Wadat Allah, a student at Hamlain University and President of the Muslim Students Association (MSA), speaks during a press conference at the Cairo-Mn office on Wednesday, January 11, 2023, in Minneapolis. A professor at Hamin University showed him a painting of the Prophet Muhammad, and Wadat Allah was one of the students in the class when it was shown.

Chicago – A university in Minnesota's decision to exclude a professor from including photographs of the Prophet Muhammad into a global art class to put the small private school at the center of discussions about how to incorporate controversial material into university courses while maintaining personality. relationship, students can respect. to be of interest

After months of publishing one semester's recordings online, the Chair of the Board of Trustees at Hamin University said Friday that the secretary was reviewing university policies and responses to student complaints and faculty members' fears regarding academic freedom. . Also on Friday, a national Islamic civil rights organization rejected accusations that the professor's behavior was hostile to Islam.

The dispute began in October when assistant professor Irika Lopez Pratler inserted a plate from the fourteenth century Prophet Muhammad into a chapter of Islamic art, prompting a Muslim student in the class to file a complaint with the university, according to media reports and stakeholders who have the support of teachers or students. .

Lopez Braiter recognizes that for many Muslims, visual representations of the Prophet Muhammad contradict their beliefs. The RPP he conveyed in interviews with the media stated that students would see pictures of religious figures, including the Prophet Muhammad. The program also includes an offer to work with students who don't want to see such images.

He also warned the class before showing a picture of the Prophet Muhammad in person. Lopez Braiter said his goal this week was to teach students the "rich diversity" of situations leading to such images.

He said in an interview with the video: "We need to recognize the internal diversity within Islam and also respect the passionate and curious minds that come from within this society and other groups, and not just follow the safest options available." . With Muqtedar Khan, Professor of International Relations at the University of Delaware. "Higher education institutions … we owe it to our students to challenge them in sometimes uncomfortable ways."

Lopez Braiter said he and his department head started talking about teaching a new training course in September, but after the accident, the department head told him his "services were no longer needed."

Hamlin's boss said the professor's contract was not renewed after the fall semester.

Through the campus of Hamlain University in Saint-Paul, Minnesota, Muslims are different from the incident and the wider academic use of the Prophet Muhammad's photo.

Gilani Hussein, Executive Director of the Minnesota Department of the Council on American Relations, was one of the first proponents of Hameen's response. He said the inclusion of the photo in class insulted Muslim students.

"That is mostly the cause of his illness," said the complaining student.

Speaking at a press conference organized by the group on Wednesday, the student, whose complaint prompted a university review, said she and other Muslim students believed the government had acted appropriately. Aram Wedtallah told reporters he had never seen a picture of the Prophet Muhammad before October.

And he said: "It breaks my heart to stand here and tell people that there is something that is hostile to Islam and hurts all of us, and not just me."

On Friday, however, the National Council on Islamic Relations dismissed allegations that Lopez Birar's actions expressed hatred of Islam. The Council on American Islamic Relations, which describes itself as the largest Islamic civil rights organization in the United States, says intent, action and circumstances matter.

"While we are not particularly encouraged to display visual images of the Prophet, we recognize that professors who analyze old paintings for academic purposes are not like opponents of Islam who display such images to offend them," the organization said. "Based on what we know at this time, we have seen no evidence whatsoever that Professor Irika Lopez Barar has acted anti-Islam or engaged in behavior that fits our definition of Islamophobia."

Rejecting Hamlain's decision to file an online petition from a scholar of Islamic art at the University of Michigan said the painting was widely shown and studied by art historians, and flourished with media detailing the university, including an email from an official to an employee. The incident called for Islamophobia. .

Among the critics was the Council on Public Affairs for Muslims and the Association for Middle Eastern Studies, which issued a statement in which he commended the professor for his sensitivity and commitment to teaching a set of positions for portraying the Prophet Muhammad in Islamic history. Islamic art experts also noted that the image is nothing like the cartoons in the French satirical newspaper Charlie Hebdo that caused the deadly attacks in 2015.

Among those pushing for Hamlin to reinstate Lopez Pratler to his post were Pen America, the American Association of University Teachers, and the university's former president.

Linda Hanson, who served as President of Hameen from 2005 to 2015, wrote in a morning message issued Wednesday evening from Minypolis: "Generations of faculty at Hamlain have learned about the belief that following clear lines of academic freedom and supporting students does not exclude one another." ." . . Star base.

The university's chancellor, Feniz Miller, defended the school's response, including a lengthy message published on Wednesday, saying that Hameen was "attacked by forces outside our university campus."

Miller writes: "Putting our students' welfare first does not deny or diminish in any way the rights and privileges guaranteed by academic freedom." But the concepts overlap.

He wrote that students also have rights that officials must protect before citing the university's relationship with the United Church.

"Doing as much good as possible means minimizing harm," says Miller. It has influenced our decisions so far and will continue to influence them in the future.

But a statement issued Friday by CEO Eileen Wattars gives more credibility to school critics and secretaries who promised, "listen and we learn."

Watters wrote: "The Hameen University Board of Trustees actively participates in reviewing university policy and responding to current student concerns and future faculty members' concerns regarding academic freedom." "Maintaining academic freedom and promoting a comprehensive and respectful educational environment for our students is a prerequisite to achieving our mission."

The statement gave no further details about how the meeting went, and the boy's president did not immediately respond to a message seeking information.

Art history teacher fired for… teaching art history

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