Your Concise Los Angeles Art Guide For January 2023

Your Concise Los Angeles Art Guide For January 2023

This month will feature ten exhibitions that confront and embrace the contradictions, fragmentation, and hybridity of our contemporary situation. The Simone Forti retrospective at MOCA celebrates the influential choreographer who has blurred the lines between dance and art for six decades. At M+B, Nevena Prižić's paintings draw on Neolithic sculpture and space-age aesthetics, while Carlos Jaramillo's photographs at Galería Guerrero document California's largest charredo, a traditional Mexican rodeo in the eastern of the Angels. Victor Estrada's drawings and paintings on display at ArtCenter showcase his distinctive style that blends punk, pop, graffiti, and the grotesque in a wild yet distinctly angelic combination.

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Nevena Prizhich: Skin of the Sun

Nevena Prižič's paintings explore the biofuturistic fusion of the body and technology. Through layers of translucent colors, it conveys suggestive organic shapes, as well as clear geometries that update modernist man-machine prototypes. Like Rorschach's psychedelic blobs, its forms are influenced by Neolithic Vinca sculptures created thousands of years ago in present-day Serbia, with space-age stripes and details of human bodies, animals, and insects.

M+B Doheny (mbart.com)
468 and 470 North Doheny Drive, West Hollywood, California
until January 7


Carlos Jaramillo: Land of Fire

The charrería is a Mexican equestrian event that includes horseback riding, rodeos, and various livestock activities. It took place on the haciendas of colonial Mexico and was recognized as the country's official national sport. Tierra del Sol is a photography exhibit by Carlos Jaramillo of California's largest charred, “El Clásico de las Américas” in October 2021 at the Pico Rivera Sports Center. His images show charros and snails dressed in costumes and photo sessions. A makeshift portrait studio on site. The hay bales and dirt floor in the gallery give physical continuity to the work on the walls.

Guerrero Gallery (guerrerogallery.com)
3407 Verdugo Road, Glassell Park, Los Angeles
Until January 14


Koichi Enamoto: Against the Day

Kochi Enomoto's paintings depict wide-eyed manga characters against backdrops of birds, buildings, soda glasses, rock band logos, and other elements of pop culture. He combines realism with comic representation and abstraction, drawing inspiration from major artistic sources such as Picasso and Mondrian, as well as ephemera digital prints. By contrast, Enomoto's first solo show outside of Japan gives Los Angeles audiences a chance to see his bravery.

Nonaka Hill Gallery (nonaka-hill.com)
720 N. Highland Avenue, Hollywood, Los Angeles
Until January 21


Very Quiet: Michael Kennedy Costa and Benjamin Rice

Benjamin Reiss's intricate sculptures take the intricate details of scientific models and add a healthy dose of absurdity. Take, for example, "Firearm (Flintlock) (Plummet)" (2018), a cutout of a hammer that turns out to be a gun with fruit instead of bullets and a miniature bowling ball sticking out. through the frozen rings of smoke in the air. In Very Quiet for Two, Rice is paired with Michael Kennedy Costa, whose haunting performance lends itself to Rice's impeccable fantasy. In monochrome grids of glued sheets of paper, Kennedy Costa paints intimate, irregular shapes that resemble topographical maps or a virus multiplying under a microscope.

Hunter Shaw Fine Art (huntershawfineart.com)
5513 Pico Boulevard, Mid Wilshire, Los Angeles
Until January 29


Ink, paper, stone: six women artists and the language of lithography

The Tamarind Lithography Workshop was founded in 1960 in Los Angeles by June Wayne with the goal of reviving lithography. Since then, various artists have published on Tamarind (he moved to Albuquerque, New Mexico in 1970), drawn by the freedom to experiment with printmaking it offers. Ink, Paper, Stone tells the story of six women artists who received printmaking grants at Tamarind in the 1960s: Ruth Asawa, Hega, Eleanor Mikus, Louise Nevelson, Irene Siegel, and Hedda Stern. Works on display range from figurative to organic abstraction to minimalism, unique to the medium that captures his diverse artistic visions, as well as the studio that made it possible.

Norton Simon Museum (nortonsimon.org)
411 West Colorado Boulevard, Pasadena, California
Until February 13


wank

Faced with the upheavals of modern society – war, disease, economic instability, ecological collapse – artists are once again interested in surrealism and magical realism, as their predecessors did a century ago in the face of a world gone mad. Originating in Europe, these movements have historically had a particular resonance in Latin America, where unusual juxtapositions are woven into the fabric of everyday life. Sueñx brings together 26 contemporary Latin American artists who use magical realism to represent the contradictions and complexities of modern times.

Error Room (tmr.la)
1811 East 20th Street, Central Alameda, Los Angeles
Until February 18


Victor Estrada: Mexican Purple

Víctor Estrada's work is typical of Los Angeles: exuberant, messy, grotesque pop music that is difficult to define. Estrada grew up between Los Angeles and El Paso and was a member of the Chicano activist group MEChA as a teenager before attending ArtCenter College of Design in Pasadena. He gained national attention when his massive foam sculpture Child/Infant (1991), depicting two large babies joined by a large phallus, was included in MOCA's landmark 1992 exhibition Helter Skelter: Los Angeles Art in the 1990s." Purple Mexican , named for a marijuana hybrid, is a 30-year study of his drawings, paintings, and sculptures that showcases a wide range of influences, from cutting-edge punk aesthetics to Chicano graphics and quirky comics.

ArtCenter, Peter and Merle Mullin Gallery (artcenter.edu)
1111 South Arroyo Parkway, Pasadena, CA
Until February 25


simone forti

The Simone Forti retrospective at MOCA spans six decades of this pioneering choreographer's career on paper, holograms, video, and performance documentation. After studying with choreographer Anna Halprin in the 1950s, Forti began experimenting with new forms of dance that included improvisation, lightness, and ease of movement. In 1961, Yoko Ono's New York loft created Dance Constructions, which blurred the line between art and dance, demonstrating the interdisciplinary curiosity she continued to explore. Dance Constructions will perform at MOCA on Thursdays, Saturdays and Sundays, showcasing Forti's lasting impact on life.

Museum of Modern Art (moca.org)
250 South Grand Avenue, Downtown, Los Angeles
January 15 – April 2


For Diving: Sarah Rosalena Brady

The land on which the Los Angeles State Historic Park stands was once the floodplain of the Los Angeles River, a major waterway for the Tongwa people who originally inhabited the area. For the Dive by Sarah Rosalena Brady is a public sculpture in the park commemorating this story. Rosalena combines Wixárika wire drawing, an art practiced by generations of women in her family, with digital fabrication to create a monument that honors tradition and looks to the future. Weather permitting, the sculpture will be submerged in rainwater in accordance with the original natural state of the site.

Los Angeles State Historic Park (clockshop.org)
1245 North Spring Street, Chinatown, Los Angeles
January 15 – April 2


Hostile Terrain '94: Undocumented Migration Project

In 1994, the US Border Patrol adopted an immigration control approach called "prevention through deterrence," which diverted undocumented immigrants from densely populated border crossings to more and more remote areas. In the decades that followed, thousands of migrants died trying to make the perilous journey across the desert. In 2009, Jason De Leon, a professor of anthropology at UCLA, launched the Undocumented Migration Project (UMP) to explore border crossings and illuminate migration issues through research and art. Hostile Terrain '94: The Undocumented Migration Project showcases the work of UMP through a photographic chronicle of migration, a collection of artifacts left behind by desert voyagers, and a recording studio where visitors can share personal immigration stories. Also on display is a 16-foot map of the Arizona-Mexico border with name tags of those killed at the crossing indicating where the bodies were found.

Plaza of Culture and Art (lapca.org)
501 North Main Street, Downtown, Los Angeles
Until July 9

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